Terri’s Tunic

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Here is my new “Easy Open-Front Tunic” that I made following Karen’s instructions from the last post.  It was easy!  I used this colorful silk that she used to demonstrate how to cut the front and neck opening, so some of my work was done for me. (Thank you, sis!)

Rather than using a trim for the bottom, I opted for a trim along the sleeve edges.  This pattern is so versatile that you could make several versions and they would all be different depending on the type of fabric and trim you use.

You could also cut a longer piece than the original instructions call for, to make a longer finished tunic.  Just remember to double the amount of length you want to add since your fabric panel is both the front and the back.

I used a trim at the edge of the sleeve/side.

I used a trim at the edge of the sleeve/side.

The hardest part to this pattern to me was the edge around the neck area.  Since it is a curve that you need to turn in twice to create the narrow finish, you may find it helpful to clip.  Be sure, however, that you create very shallow clips so that you do not create a raw spot in your finished edge.

Use very small clips in the curve around the neck.

Use very small clips in the curve around the neck.

Take your time pressing and pinning the edges. I found it helpful to use plenty of pins, especially on the curved neck area.

Take your time pressing and pinning the edges. I found it helpful to use plenty of pins, especially on the curved neck area.

This is a simple pattern, but remember that “simple for the experienced sewer” does not mean a pattern and instructions are suitable for an inexperienced sewer.  If you are new to sewing, don’t try this one just yet.  The slippery fabric will be hard for you to handle, and the tedious narrow hem will be frustrating.  But, we have other posts and patterns here on our website for beginners, and we will soon begin posting our Beginning Sewing video classes.

We are “in production” for our video classes right now (which means we are taping with an iPhone, throwing away a lot of outtakes, and learning to use iMovie).  Stay tuned!

 

Easy Open-Front Tunic

Easy Open-Front Tunic

Long Tunic Wrap with Fringe

Long Tunic with Fringe

 

Black Tunic with Fringe

Black Tunic with Fringe

Swim Suit Cover with Ball Fringe Trim

Swim Suit Cover with Ball Fringe Trim

 

 

 

 

Flowy tunics and tops have become quite a fashion accessory.  I have seen them all over department stores and boutiques. I want to show you how to make an easy one, without the need of a pattern. You will find this process to be very forgiving, so perfection is not necessary–you will be able to tell that from my instructions!

*One word of caution about fabric choice: Be sure you do not choose a fabric with design that all goes in one direction.  If you do, the design will be upside down on the front or back.

PROJECT SUPPLIES:

  • 1 3/4 yards of thin, softly draping fabric–can be 45″ or 60″ wide. (The width of the fabric doesn’t matter, but if you use fabric that is 45″ wide you probably won’t have to cut any length off on the arm.)
  • 2 1/2 yards of fringe or other trim
  • Matching thread

TOOLS:

  • Sewing machine
  • Serger (optional)
  • Scissors
  • Yard stick or straight edge
  • Fabric marker and/or chalk
  • French curve
  • Tape measure
  • Pins

Prepare your fabric by pre-washing and straightening the grain.

CUTTING OUT:

How much length you cut depends on how long you want your wrap to be. I am rather short, so I cut about 60 inches of length.  Measure down from your shoulders to the length you want it to be, double that number,and then add about 3 inches. Cut that length. (The length is doubled because it will become both the back and the front panels.)

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Once you have the fabric cut, you need to locate the center point of the entire piece. Carefully fold in half lengthwise, and then fold crosswise. The center point will be the corner that has no fabric edges – only folds. Make a chalk or other mark at this point.

Mark center point at fold with pins or chalk.

Mark center point at fold with pins or chalk.

2. Open out to a single layer. You should have the center point of the fabric marked.

Fabric Center Point Mark

Fabric Center Point Mark

Find the center point of one cut edge length and mark. Using a yardstick, chalk a line from the marked center point of the fabric, straight down to the marked middle point of the cut edge (not selvage edge) of the fabric. This will be a cutting line for the front opening of the tunic.

Use a yard stick or other long straight edge to draw a straight line from the centerpoint of the fabric to the centerpoint of one of the edges.

Use a yard stick or other long straight edge to draw a straight line from the centerpoint of the fabric to the centerpoint of one of the edges.

3. At the middle point of the fabric where this cutting line starts, use the French curve and chalk to mark the left side of the neckline by following around the curved ruler. Flip the ruler over and do the same on the right side of the neckline. For both sides, draw the curve toward the bottom to tie back in to the original straight line that you first drew. Your chalk marks should resemble a keyhole, with a line straight up the middle!

To make this step more clear, please watch the following video:

4. Cut along the “keyhole” line.  This will become your front neck opening.

5. Serge or zig-zag stitch around this neckline to keep it from stretching out of shape while working with it.

6. At this point, drape the garment around your neck as you now have a neckline opening. The fabric I used for this particular wrap was 60 inches wide. Many others I have made started with fabrics that were 45 inches in width, which, for me, is a great sleeve length.

Since the 60-inch wide fabric made my sleeve too long, I cut it off from the selvage edge. This worked well because this fabric’s selvage edge was not usable, so I would have had to do a sleeve finish anyway. Sometimes you have fabric that has a nice, inconspicuous selvage. In that case, no sleeve hem is needed–that is, if you like the sleeve length.

The selvage edge of my fabric was not usable, so I would have cut it off and hemmed the edge even if it had been a length I could have used.

Sometimes selvage edges are nice enough to use for your sleeve edge finish if the length is good; sometimes not.

If you determine that you need to cut the sleeve edges, decide what length you like and add 1/2 inch.  Hem these sleeve edges by following the instructions in step seven for the tunic hem.

7. You now need to finish the front opening edge and hem the front and back. Press up the raw (or serged) edges 1/4 inch all the way around the garment. Press it up once again the same amount and secure with a pin. (For a neat look, miter the corners.) Stitch.

Hem the garment fronts and backs. Also hem the sleeve if you determine the need.

Hem the garment fronts and backs. Also hem the sleeve if you determine the need.

8. Pin fringe trim (or other trim) across the bottom of the back section and the two front sections, turning under (or in) the raw edge of trim. Stitch though all layers.  You can use two straight stitches about a 1/4″ apart at the top of the trim, or you can use a zig zag stitch.

9. To create armholes in your tunic, lay it on flat surface with right sides out and wrong sides together. Line up the front and the back. Measure down from shoulder 10 inches and mark with a horizontal pin.  This forms the opening for your armhole. Starting at the bottom of the 10-inch opening, draw a 6-inch line with chalk or a fabric marker, 1/2 inch from fabric edge.

Lay the tunic on a flat surface to mark the side seam closure.

Lay the tunic on a flat surface to mark the side seam closure.

To create the sleeve and side seam, mark a line 6 inches long beginning 10 inches from the shoulder fold.

To create the sleeve and side seam, mark a line 6 inches long beginning 10 inches from the shoulder fold.

10. To create the sleeve and side seam, pin together on this line and stitch, wrong sides together, backstitching at the beginning and end of the line.

Put it on and enjoy!

Be sure to send us photos of your tunic!

It’s been a busy summer, but it is time I got back to writing about what is going on here at Golden Needles.  Our classes are going strong!  We are finishing up a Beginning Sewing 102, and will start Beginning Sewing 101 again on September 2.

If you live in the Middle Georgia area, we still have a few spots left for our morning and evening sessions.  We would love to have you!  Come have a great time while learning to sew.

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Here are some examples of the projects recent students have completed.

Kim's pretty apron

Kim did a great job on her apron!

Friends Wendy and Freida showing off their new skills!

Friends Wendy and Freida showing off their new skills!

Our Zippered Throw Pillow pattern becomes a beautiful home decor item when our students choose great fabrics!

Our Zippered Throw Pillow pattern becomes a beautiful home decor item when our students choose great fabrics!

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Miranda’s lined tote bag is even prettier with the lace detail she added at home!

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Isabel's duffle bag turned out beautiful!

Isabel’s duffle bag turned out beautiful!

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Isabel is really enjoying learning to sew!

Isabel is really enjoying learning to sew!

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Jill the (Relatively) Reluctant

I’m Karen Golden Smith, the other half of Golden Needles.  My sister Terri is the one usually doing the blogging since I work full time as a school counselor.  I’m counting the days to my retirement.  I love my job, … Continue reading

Christmas Pillow Talk

’tis the season to be busy.  And the sewing room is no different.

I needed something festive on my front porch.  To keep from looking like a Scrooge residence from the street.  So I pugged in a pre-lit Christmas tree and plopped it in front of the window.  Of course, only the lights on the top and bottom came on.  Back to the attic I went to dig out strands of lights to add to my tired old tree.  So if you come to my front porch, please don’t look too closely.  It is better appreciated from a distance.

After the tree was sufficiently twinkling, I decided the porch needed a little something else.  Pillows for the rocking chairs on either side of the tree.

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This is our Zippered Throw Pillow from our Beinning Sewing 101 class; I added the appliquéd letters.  And I did it the “old fashioned way.”  No embroidery machine.  Just my Pfaff sewing machine, which does a very nice satin stitch.  But after P – E, I was really wishing I had one of those nice embroidery machines like Karen and Jill and Jenae and Penny and Millee have.  I know I could have found “JOY” and “PEACE” patterns with holly vines or Christmas lights intertwined.  Or angels or stars.

I wonder if it’s too late to sit on Santa’s knee?

Sewing Class Pictures

Our latest 101 classes were fun and productive!  Students learned the basics of the sewing machine and sewing tools, the characteristics of fabric and how to prepare it for cutting out a pattern, and many other useful lessons.  With several projects, they learned many useful sewing techniques such as installing zippers, creating buttonholes, topstitching, finishing seams,  forming hems, and creating a casing to insert elastic.

Several of these students have joined us for Beginning Sewing 102, where we are making a lined tote bag and beautiful lined duffle bag, and a cozy zippered hoodie.

If you live in the middle Georgia area, come join us!

Casey did a beautiful job on her apron

Cassie did a beautiful job on her apron

Andrea enjoyed making her apron

Andrea enjoyed making her apron

Miranda's pretty apron

Miranda’s pretty apron

Dana chose a colorful fabric for her apron

Dana chose a colorful fabric for her apron

Mary chose a sturdy gingham for her pretty apron

Mary chose a sturdy gingham for her pretty apron

Miranda at the sewing machine

Miranda at the sewing machine

Dana trying out the serger

Dana trying out the serger

Mary and her grandaughter Savanna working hard at their pressing stations

Mary and her grandaughter Savanna working hard at their pressing stations

Andrea's chevron pillow

Andrea’s chevron pillow

Dana's Japanese print pillow

Dana’s Japanese print pillow

Students installed center zippers at the back of their throw pillows

Students installed center zippers at the back of their throw pillows

A Class Full of Friends

This past summer, we had a group of friends who signed up together for Sewing 101 and 102 classes.  We all had a great time!  Here are a few photos to prove it!

Kathleen and Elise chose the same fabric for their aprons

Kathleen and Elise chose the same fabric for their aprons

Rocky loves to keep us company in the sewing room

Rocky loves to keep us company in the sewing room

Kathleen at the sewing machine

Kathleen at the sewing machine

Julie working hard on her tote bag in 102

Julie working hard on her tote bag in 102

Busy bees Julie, Kathleen, and Elise

Busy bees Julie, Kathleen, and Elise

Elise concentrating on her straight seams

Elise concentrating on her straight seams

Kathleen's pajama shorts

Kathleen’s pajama shorts

Elise models her cute pajama shorts

Elise models her cute pajama shorts

Learning to Sew – Travel Pillowcase #2

This travel-sized pillowcase has an overlapping back opening to insert the pillow

This travel-sized pillowcase has an overlapping back opening to insert the pillow

Gather Your Tools and Supplies

If you made the pillowcase from the last article, I hope you enjoyed the process while learning how to sew!  This pillowcase is the same size, and takes the same sized pillow insert.  But where the first one had a traditional side opening, this version has an overlapping back opening to insert the pillow.

For this project, you will need: 1/2 yard of cotton fabric, at least 44″ wide, thread to match, and a pillow insert.  You will also need paper or pattern transfer fabric to make your pattern.  Alternately, you can draw the dimensions directly onto the fabric.  For either of these options, you will need a marker or fabric marker, and a straight edge.

You will also need the following sewing tools:  sewing pins, dressmaking shears, pinking shears, a hem gauge, and a seam ripper for those inevitable mistakes.  Small snips or scissors are also handy for cutting threads and other small jobs.

Gather your supplies before you begin

Gather your supplies before you begin

Create Your Pattern and Cut the Fabric

To create the pattern, draw two rectangles onto thin paper or pattern transfer fabric. This special fabric should be located in the interfacing section of your nearest Hancock’s or other fabric store.  (If they don’t have it, a thin inexpensive interfacing would also work.)  One rectangle should be 12″ x 13″ (the pillowcase back), and the other 8.5″ x 13″ (the pillowcase front).  The front is placed on the fold of the fabric on one of the 13″ sides.  The back is placed straight on the grain of the fabric.  (See Learning to Sew – Fabric for details about grainline and straightening fabric)  Draw a horizontal line on the pillowcase back pattern piece parallel with the 13″ side of the rectangle.  Refer to the photo below for all pattern markings.

Mark rectangles as shown here to create a pattern for your pillowcase

Mark rectangles as shown here to create a pattern for your pillowcase

After you have pre-washed and dried your fabric, and straightened at least one end, lay it out flat on the cutting surface.  Lay the pattern pieces out on your fabric as shown below.  Make sure the straight-of-grain arrow on the pillowcase back is parallel to the selvage by measuring the distance between them.  Place the pillowcase front on  the fold where the arrows indicate.  Pin the pattern on the fabric; cut out with dressmaker shears.

Then move the tape measure to the other end of the arrow to make sure the arrow is the same distance at each end

Then move the tape measure to the other end of the arrow to make sure the arrow is the same distance at each end

Measure the distance between one end of the straight-of-grain arrow and the selvage

Measure the distance between one end of the straight-of-grain arrow and the selvage

Pin the pattern pieces on your fabric; cut out carefully with dressmaker shears

Pin the pattern pieces on your fabric; cut out carefully with dressmaker shears

An alternate method of cutting out the pieces of this pillowcase is to draw the rectangles directly onto the fabric.  Use a fabric marker and a straight edge to draw the measurements, taking your time to make sure of your accuracy.  Be sure to draw the 8.5″ by 13″ rectangle on the fold, as shown in the photo below.  Remember, cutting mistakes cannot be corrected like sewing mistakes can.  Place  pins just inside the marked lines to keep the fabric layers from shifting while you cut.  Cut with dressmaker shears.

If you wish, draw the squares directly onto the prepared fabric rather than making a pattern

If you wish, draw the squares directly onto the prepared fabric rather than making a pattern

If you have access to a rotary cutter and mat, you can use these handy tools to cut the pieces of the pillowcase out.  These tools make quick work of straight line cutting, and are very popular with quilters.  If you decide to use a rotary cutter, be sure to practice on some scraps to get the hang of keeping the cutter straight and the straight edge still.

Rotary cutters are very popular with quilters; because you are cutting straight lines, the rotary cutter can be used here as well.

Rotary cutters are very popular with quilters; because you are cutting straight lines, the rotary cutter can be used here as well.

Assemble Your Pillowcase

Now you are ready to assemble your pillowcase.  Remove pins and pattern from the fabric.

To finish the edges of the back opening, turn one 13″ side of the back 1/2″ toward the wrong side, using a hem gauge for accuracy; press.  Turn again, using the last turn as a guide.  My second turn measured 5/8″ in this sample.  Press this turn, then pin for sewing.  Repeat for second back piece.  Sew along the folded edge, taking care to keep your seam as straight as possible.  Be sure to backstitch at the beginning and end of your stitch line to secure the stitches.  Go easy on the foot pedal; this isn’t Nascar!

Turn and press twice; sew along turned edge.  This creates a polished finish for the back opening.

Turn and press twice; sew along turned edge. This creates a polished finish for the back opening.

Unfold the pillowcase front and lay it flat with the right side up.  With right sides together, place one of the backs along the left edge of the front, with the finished edge toward the middle.  Place the other back on the right side, using the same procedure.  The finished edges will overlap about 4.5″.

Place the first back piece as shown, with right sides together and the finished edge toward the middle

Place the first back piece as shown, with right sides together and the finished edge toward the middle

Place the second piece as shown here; pin all around the outside for sewing.

Place the second piece as shown here; pin all around the outside for sewing.

Using a 1/2″ seam allowance, sew all around the outside of the pillowcase. Start on one of the sides, and not on a corner. When you get to a corner you will need to pivot. To do this, stop your stitch when you are 1/2″ away from the corner. Use your hem gauge to be sure of where you should stop. With the needle still down in the fabric, lift the presser foot lever. Turn the fabric for stitching the next side, checking again to be sure you are at 1/2″ for the next seam. Repeat this process at each corner, and stitch until you reach the point where you started. Back stitch here to secure the stitches.  See the short video below for a visual of pivoting.

With pinking shears, trim the outside of the pillowcase.  Take care to only cut the outside raw edge, leaving most of the seam allowance.  Trim the corners diagonally, but do not cut too close to the stitches in the corner.

Cut just the outside edge with pinking shears to keep the raw edges from raveling

Trim the corners diagonally, being careful not to get too close to the stitching line

Trim the corners diagonally, being careful not to get too close to the stitching line

Turn the pillowcase right side out; press. Insert pillow into the back opening and adjust. Stand back and admire your work!

Insert the pillow into the back

Insert the pillow into the back

The back of the pillowcase should look like this when you get the pillow inserted and adjusted

The back of the pillowcase should look like this when you get the pillow inserted and adjusted

If you make this pillowcase, we would sure love to hear about your experience. We’d also love a photo or two, so we can admire your work as well.

Next time, we will tackle a project using a commercial sewing pattern.  Hope you will join us!

Learning to Sew – A Simple Travel Pillowcase

A Cute and Practical Travel Pillowcase

A Cute and Practical Travel Pillowcase

Now that you have made friends with your sewing machine and gathered a few must-have tools, let’s start sewing!  This travel pillowcase is a simple first sewing project that you will actually enjoy using.  And if you feel the urge to make more after your first one, these little pillowcases make great gifts.

This project is actually the first of two different styles of travel pillowcases.  The next “Beginning to Sew” post will be the second pillowcase.  I suggest that you make them both for a good introduction to using your sewing machine.  These would be great projects for a child learning to sew as well.

For this project, you will need 1/2 yard of cotton fabric, at least 44″ wide, and thread to match.  Pick a thread that will blend well as your stitches are likely not to be perfect; a thread just slightly darker than the fabric will blend well.  To test the thread color, pull a single strand across the fabric, in good natural light if possible, to see if it will blend well.

Besides your sewing machine, you will need these tools:  fabric shears, small scissors for snipping threads, pinking shears, straight pins, hem gauge, fabric marker, straight edge, and a seam ripper to correct any sewing mistakes.  You will also need paper or pattern tracing fabric if you want to make a pattern for this project, rather than marking the cutting dimensions directly onto the pillowcase fabric.  To use your new pillowcase, you will need to purchase a 12 x 16 travel pillow.

Prewash you fabric by wetting it and drying it in the dryer.  I use the rinse cycle on my washer, then toss it into the dryer.  Press any wrinkles out of the fabric, and then straighten at least one cut edge of the fabric.  See this previous article and video on how to straighten your fabric in preparation for cutting out your pattern.  Fold your fabric with the selvage edges (factory edges) together, and the straightened edge together, and lay on a flat surface.

If you wish to make a pattern, draw a 13″ x 21″ rectangle onto thin paper or pattern tracing fabric (available at most fabric stores in the interfacing area).  Refer to the picture below to see the notations you need to make on your pattern.  The two lines at the lower end are drawn two inches and four inches away from the edge.  Alternately, you can draw the rectangle directly onto the fabric using a pencil or a fabric marker and a straight edge.

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Pin the pattern onto the fabric, with one short edge along the fabric fold as shown.  If you have opted to draw the rectangle onto the fabric, make sure you use a straight edge, and that the dimensions are correct on all sides; place pins inside the rectangle to keep the layers from shifting.  Using dressmaker shears, cut along the pattern edge or drawn mark.  At the corners, cut past the edge enough to turn the shears smoothly to cut in the next direction.

Angled Dressmaker's Shears make cutting out pattern pieces easier and more accurate.  The bottom  blade should be resting on the cutting surface.  If you are using a dining table, be sure to cover the surface with a protective layer of thick paper or a plastic cutting mat.

Angled Dressmaker’s Shears make cutting out pattern pieces easier and more accurate. The bottom blade should be resting on the cutting surface. If you are using a piece of furniture such as a dining table, be sure to cover the surface with a protective layer of thick paper or a plastic cutting mat.

Take the pins out of the pattern and fabric, and fold the pillowcase right sides together.  (Hint:  if you fold your fabric with the wrong sides together before you pin the pattern on and cut it out, this step will already be done.)  Pin the long edges together for sewing.

Turn your pins as shown here, so they are easy to remove before getting to the machine's needle.

Turn your pins as shown here, so they are easy to remove before getting to the machine’s needle.

Using a 1/2 inch seam allowance, sew the long edges, backstitching at the beginning and end to secure.  Trim the raw edges with pinking shears.  (Do not trim the raw open edge of the pillowcase.)

Trim just the ends of the raw edges, leaving as much of the seam allowance as possible.

Trim just the ends of the raw edges, leaving as much of the seam allowance as possible.

Trim the raw edge with pinking shears to keep them from raveling.

Trim the raw edge with pinking shears to keep them from raveling.

Pinking Shears can be expensive.  Look for a coupon or buy on sale.

Pinking Shears can be expensive. Look for a coupon or buy on sale.

With wrong sides together, use a hem gauge to turn the bottom raw edge up two inches.  Pin in place; press.  Remove pins.  Turn the folded edge up two inches, using the first turn as a guide.  Pin in place; press.

Use a hem gauge to turn the edge two inches, with the wrong sides together and the right side up.

Use a hem gauge to turn the edge two inches, with the wrong sides together and the right side up.

If you have a free-arm style sewing machine, use that feature for this next step.  Topstitch along the lower edge of the pillowcase.  Take your time, and try to keep this stitch as straight as possible.  For a prettier topstitch, change your stitch length to 3, rather than 2.5.  Backstitch when you come all the way around to the starting point.  Then topstitch along the turned edge of the pillowcase, using the same procedure.

Most modern machines have a Free-Arm design.  My Pfaff has a removable bed.  This design makes sewing in a small circle much easier, such as a sleeve or in this small pillowcase.

Most modern machines have a Free-Arm design. My Pfaff has a removable bed. This feature makes sewing in a small circle much easier, such as a sleeve or in this small pillowcase.

Topstitch along the edge, taking your time to keep the stitch line as straight as you can.

Topstitch along the edge, taking your time to keep the stitch line as straight as you can.

Topstitch along the folded edge, using the same procedure as before.

Topstitch along the folded edge, using the same procedure as before.

Enjoy your new Travel Pillow!

Enjoy your new Travel Pillow!

Turn your pillow case right side out, and insert a 12 x 16 travel pillow.  Congratulations on finishing your sewing project!  Hopefully, this is the beginning of a fun new artistic expression!  Please send us a picture of your finished project, so we can brag on you!  Stay tuned for the next post on another style of travel pillowcase.